Bedfont Lane Recreation Ground
Trees being planted in 23-24
Tree planting plans for 23-24 have not yet been finalised. You can view the planting done in the previous season below.
Trees planted in recent seasons
1
250 × whips of Beech at Around playground (in 22-23)
Fagus sylvatica

Beech trees are large native trees with smooth grey bark and oval leaves. They produce triangular nuts held in woody cases in the autumn which in some years, known as mast years, can occur in vast quantities.

Environmental Benefits

Trees provide more benefits the older and larger they are.

Leaf coverage in spring, summer, autumn
Biodiversity Benefits

Trees support 100s of other living things. This tree provides a large benefit to insects (biomass of foliage insects).

98 insect species associated with this tree
206 lichen species associated with this tree
2
36 × whips of Hawthorn at Gaps in hedges (in 22-23)
Crataegus monogyna

Hawthorn is one of the most common small trees. It is a lovely, rather unkempt, tree with masses of blossom in May, and red berries - or haws - in the autumn.

Also known as
  • May
Environmental Benefits

Trees provide more benefits the older and larger they are.

Leaf coverage in spring, summer, autumn
Biodiversity Benefits

Trees support 100s of other living things. This tree provides a large benefit to insects (biomass of foliage insects).

209 insect species associated with this tree
3
140 × whips of Hornbeam at Southville Rd boundary (in 22-23)
Carpinus betulus

Hornbeams are fine attractive trees that eventually become quite large, but not quite as big as beech trees.

Look out for fluted, muscular trunks and serrated oval leaves, similar to beech. Drooping clusters of winged nuts become quite conspicuous in the autumn.

Environmental Benefits

Trees provide more benefits the older and larger they are.

Leaf coverage in spring, summer, autumn
Biodiversity Benefits

Trees support 100s of other living things. This tree provides a medium benefit to insects (biomass of foliage insects).

51 insect species associated with this tree
4
3 × Italian Alder (in 22-23)
Alnus cordata

Italian Alders are tall graceful trees which keep their heart-shaped, or cordate, leaves well into December or even January in some years. Their leaves won't entirely drop off until striking acid yellow male catkins appear in February. Like all Alders, it has small cones similar to many conifers.

Environmental Benefits

Trees provide more benefits the older and larger they are.

Life expectancy medium
Eventual size large
Leaf size medium
Leaf coverage in spring, summer, autumn
5
5 × Small-leaved Lime (in 22-23)
Tilia cordata 'Erecta'

One of the parents of the hybrid Common Lime, this tree has small round heart-shape leaves. It produces wood that is ideal for carving.

A cultivar maintaining a neat conical shape.


Green Spaces: Planting in this and recent seasons
Bedfont Close Open Space
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Bedfont Green
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Bedfont Lane Recreation Ground
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Bedfont Recreation Ground
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Boston Manor Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Brabazon Road Open Space
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Brent Lea Recreation Ground
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Bridge House Gardens and Bridge House Pond
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Carville Hall North Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Chiswick Back Common
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Church Road Allotments
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Farnell Road Open Space
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Gainsborough Gardens (Hounslow)
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Grosvenor Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Grovestile Waye Open Space
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Hanworth Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Hatton Cemetery
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Heston Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Hounslow Heath
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Inwood Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Isleworth Cemetery
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Jersey Gardens
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Lampton Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Lampton Park Covid Memorial
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Osterley Library
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Promenade Approach
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Rectory Meadow
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Redlees Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Silverhall Nature Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
South Road Open Space
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Southville Road Youth Centre
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Stamford Brook Common
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
St. Dunstan's Park
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
St Nicholas Church Burial Ground
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Stoneywall Open Space
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Sutton Lane Allotments
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Sutton Playing Fields
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Thornbury Playing fields
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Turnham Green
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Waye Avenue Open Space
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap
Whitton Dene / Duke of Northumberland River open land
Map data © Mapbox © OpenStreetMap

Elsewhere on Hounslow Greentalk

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February 2024
Mimosa is our Tree of the Month

One of the surest signs that winter is in its last gasp is the appearance of Mimosa blossom.

Admittedly, it's not a common sight, there are only 46 in the TreeTalk database, but when you see one in flower during February, it is guaranteed to stand out. Mimosas, or Silver Wattle trees, are a species of Acacia from Australia and consequently appear very exotic looking for London. Their evergreen composite leaves are comprised of hundreds of tiny leaflets. But it is the dazzling daffodil yellow blossom that will turn your head. Not only does it look amazing, it's deliciously fragrant too.

Do you know that you can adopt a tree near you for free?